Facebook glitch in May made millions of private posts public

Photographer: Wilfred Iven

Photographer: Wilfred Iven

 

“Facebook says a software bug made some private posts public for as many as 14 million users over several days in May,” wrote The Associated Press for CBC News on June 7, 2018.

The Associated Press continued, “The problem, which Facebook says it has fixed, is the latest privacy scandal for the world’s largest social media company. On Thursday, the company said the bug automatically suggested that users make new posts public, even if they had previously restricted to “friends only” or another private setting. If users did not notice the new default suggestion, they unwittingly sent their post to a broader audience than they had intended.

Erin Egan, Facebook’s chief privacy officer, said the bug did not affect past posts. She added that Facebook is notifying users who posted publicly during the time the bug was active to review their posts.”

Read the full article here. 

No reliable treatment for Lyme disease

Photographer: Rawpixel.com

Photographer: Rawpixel.com

 

Mary Beth Pfeiffer, an investigative journalist from New York State, is author of Lyme: The First Epidemic of Climate Change.

“Like soldiers in an advancing front, blacklegged ticks are today marching across Canada armed chiefly, but not solely, with a pathogen that indiscriminately sickens and disables: Lyme disease,” wrote Mary Beth Pfeiffer for The Globe and Mail on May 11, 2018.

Pfeiffer continued, “In 1990, ticks that carried the infection were found only in Long Point in far southern Ontario. But hitched to birds and enabled by a warmer climate, these blood-sucking arachnids have found a new and rich frontier across vast tracts of the country. They are in Ontario’s provincial parks, in Quebec’s Montérégie region, where temperatures have risen 0.8 degrees Celsius since 1970, along Manitoba’s Lake of the Woods, and in many parts of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and British Columbia.”

Read the full article here. 

Trump tax reform means thousands of Canadian residents are facing massive bills

Photographer: Rawpixel.com

Photographer: Rawpixel.com

 

“Thousands of Canadian residents are facing massive tax bills because of U.S. President Donald Trump’s December tax reform, CBC News has learned,” wrote Elizabeth Thompson for CBC News on April 30, 2018.

Thompson continued, “Canadian residents with U.S. or dual citizenship who own Canadian corporations are being slapped by an American measure meant to get big U.S. multinationals to stop parking billions of dollars in offshore subsidiaries — a one-time retroactive tax being levied on all of their companies’ retained earnings going back to 1986.

Tax lawyers and accountants say they are struggling to find strategies to soften the blow of what one of them calls a “nightmare” situation for their clients.”

Read the full article here. 

Average Canadian house price falls 10% in past year

Photographer:  Nathan Fertig

Photographer: Nathan Fertig

 

“The average price of a Canadian home sold last month was just over $491,000, a 10 per cent drop in the past year,” wrote Pete Evans for CBC News on April 13, 2018.

Evans continued, “The Canadian Real Estate Association said Friday that the number of homes sold also plunged, by almost a quarter from the same month a year ago, which was the best March for home sales on record.

The real estate group blamed recent mortgage rule changes for wreaking havoc on the market, creating feverish demand for starter homes, but making it much harder to move up.”

Read the full article here. 

Scientists say more than half your body isn’t human

Photographer:  Ilya Yakover

Photographer: Ilya Yakover

 

“More than half of your body is not human, say scientists.

Human cells make up only 43% of the body’s total cell count. The rest are microscopic colonists,” wrote James Gallagher, Presenter, The Second Genome, BBC Radio 4 for BBC News on April 10, 2018.

Gallagher continued, “Understanding this hidden half of ourselves – our microbiome – is rapidly transforming understanding of diseases from allergy to Parkinson’s.

The field is even asking questions of what it means to be “human” and is leading to new innovative treatments as a result.

“They are essential to your health,” says Prof Ruth Ley, the director of the department of microbiome science at the Max Planck Institute, “your body isn’t just you”.

 

No matter how well you wash, nearly every nook and cranny of your body is covered in microscopic creatures.”

Read the full article here. 

 

Lawyer says CRA owes clients an apology

Photographer: Tim Gouw

Photographer: Tim Gouw

 

“The lawyer for a Nanaimo, B.C., couple who won a groundbreaking award for damages because of malicious prosecution by the Canada Revenue Agency says the minister of national revenue owes his clients an apology,” wrote Jason Proctor for CBC News on March 7, 2018.

Proctor continued, “Steven Kelliher also said that, while Tony and Helen Samaroo have been acquitted of tax evasion in criminal court and awarded $1.7 million for mistreatment in civil court, the CRA still appears bent on pursuing them in tax court. 

“What does it take? What does it take to tell these people they made a mistake and move on? This is all about them being right and a bit of vengeance thrown in,” he said to CBC News.”

Read the full article here. 

CRA ruins reputations of B.C couple through malicious prosecution of tax evasion

Photographer: Rawpixel.com

Photographer: Rawpixel.com

 

“A B.C. Supreme Court judge has slammed the Canada Revenue Agency for suppressing and misstating evidence in its zeal to prosecute a Vancouver Island couple for tax evasion,” wrote Jason Proctor for CBC News on March 5, 2018.

Proctor continued, “In a blistering 70-page ruling, Justice Robert Punnett ordered the CRA to pay Tony and Helen Samaroo nearly $1.7 million in damages for malicious prosecution of a deeply flawed case that ruined their reputations.

“A government agency maliciously used the criminal justice system to pursue the plaintiffs, and its wrongful conduct continued into the criminal trial itself. The CRA was seeking substantial terms of imprisonment and significant penalties. The manner in which the prosecution was initiated and carried out was egregious. It must be denounced,” Punnett wrote.”

Read the full article here. 

Personality can influence the likelihood of dog bites

Photographer: Suvan Chowdhury

Photographer: Suvan Chowdhury

 

“Having a nervous personality could boost your chances of being bitten by a dog,” wrote Kennedy Schmidt for CBC News on February 10, 2018.

Schmidt continued, “Results from a recent survey compiled by the University of Liverpool show that those who scored as being more “emotionally stable” on a personality test were less likely to be bitten by a dog.

The research could have consequences for anyone who has ever cowered in the presence of a dog, even if they may not be able to control their emotional responses enough to avoid being bitten. 

Experts say that although a dog’s reason for becoming excited or upset may be hard to pinpoint, the actions that follow will most likely depend on how a person responds to the animal.”

Read the full article here. 

 

Canadian pot stock meltdown

Photographer: Wilfred Iven

Photographer: Wilfred Iven

 

“Investors’ collective high over Canada’s burgeoning marijuana industry has evaporated, to be replaced by a comedown,” wrote Jen Skerritt for Bloomberg News published on The Globe and Mail on February 2, 2018.

Skerritt continued, “Marijuana stocks tumbled Friday amid a wave of “panic-selling” and concern that companies that had seen ballooning share prices recently are now overvalued. The BI Canada Cannabis Index plunged as much as 19 per cent, its biggest intraday drop on record, while the nation’s largest producers including Canopy Growth Corp. and Aurora Cannabis Inc. tumbled more than 40 per cent from their January highs.”

Read the full article here. 

 

Rogers call centre employees pressured to upsell customers

Photographer: Benjamin Child

Photographer: Benjamin Child

 

“Call centre employees working for Rogers Communications say the telecom company is pressuring them to try to make a sale on every call — even to elderly people who don’t understand or need certain products or services,” wrote Erica Johnson for CBC News on January 14, 2018.

Johnson continued, “In emails and interviews with Go Public, dozens of Rogers workers say they’re under “extreme pressure” to hit sales targets or risk termination.

Their claims come on the heels of Bell Canada workers revealing similar pressures to upsell customers, often at the expense of ethics.

“You’re supposed to look at a customer’s account and sell them cable, home phone, home security, a credit card — whatever is missing,” says an employee who currently works at Rogers’ major call centre in Ottawa and has asked CBC to conceal his identity to avoid retribution in his workplace

He says even when people are off sick, their sales targets aren’t adjusted unless they go on short-term disability, “so you’re at home, trying to get better, but stressing about how you’re going to keep your job.”

He admits when he is “desperate” to earn sales points, he signs up seniors for internet service, and then tells them a technician is going to come to their house “to install a modem for their TV” — modems are required for internet, not TV.”

Read the full article here. 

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